Aufrufe
vor 1 Jahr

HANSA 08-2019

  • Text
  • Hansaplus
  • Maritime
  • Hansa
  • Shipping
  • Ships
  • Hamburg
  • Marine
  • Schiffe
  • Schifffahrt
  • Vessels
  • Offshore
Mammoet | Strom-Hubs auf See | VDMA | Interview Indian Register | Klassifikation | Flaggen & Politik | Shipmanagement | EU-Regulierung | Peter Gast Schiffahrtsregatta

Schiffstechnik | Ship

Schiffstechnik | Ship Technology Market share of Top 10 IACS members IR 0,80% RMRS 0,80% DNV GL 20% RINA 2,90% KR 4,70% BV 8,50% CCS 9% LR 16% ClassNK 18,60% ABS 17,50% © Clarksons Research/ HANSA Top 10 (GT) classed fleets June 2018 compared to June 2017, number of vessels Oil Tanker Bulker General Cargo Special Non-Cargo Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 DNV GL 1120 1163 1192 1127 1101 1094 3159 3290 3406 1005 1016 1022 2364 2421 2564 ClassNK 824 829 858 4033 4019 4004 1438 1458 1497 1512 1477 1502 584 625 690 BV 657 663 617 1086 1026 1049 1597 1650 1712 933 910 934 3415 3291 3309 ABS 1488 1442 1402 1076 1069 1040 726 728 681 459 449 428 3511 3736 3929 LR 1240 1229 1193 1261 1230 1199 1113 1128 1129 729 731 696 2299 2280 2264 CCS 832 592 565 1548 1392 1342 814 753 684 431 404 387 1513 1116 1056 RINA 419 401 372 332 330 300 719 710 605 257 233 234 1771 1561 1466 KR 315 321 332 496 500 515 545 537 554 600 588 564 432 434 445 RMRS 311 321 343 32 37 42 757 789 820 363 358 349 902 897 905 IR 138 136 134 75 80 84 426 426 376 46 42 39 671 646 644 Top 10 (GT) classed fleets June 2018 compared to June 2017, mill. GT Oil Tanker Bulker General Cargo Special Non-Cargo Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 Juni 19 Juni 18 Juni 17 DNV GL 59,9 63 65,1 48,3 46,7 46,6 104 105,3 104,3 31,8 31,1 29,8 27,3 27,4 26,4 ClassNK 29,2 28,1 29,1 158,6 158,2 157,7 30 28,2 26 34,7 33,4 33,4 0,7 0,7 0,7 ABS 93,4 90,3 87 56,7 56,2 53,8 45,4 43,8 38,4 20,5 19,1 17,3 21,4 21,8 21,3 LR 70,4 69,4 66,3 58,1 55,4 53,2 42 39,9 37,9 30,2 29,6 28 16,5 16,3 15,9 BV 20,1 20,3 18,4 43,4 40,5 41,3 24 23,9 23,9 15,2 14,1 13,2 13,2 12,3 11,9 CCS 25,8 21 18,6 63 55 51,1 22,2 18,7 15,1 5,1 4,8 4,2 6 5,6 5,4 KR 12,6 12,5 14 28,3 28,6 29,6 9,2 8,7 9,6 12,7 12,7 11,6 1 0,9 1 RINA 7,6 6,7 6,3 11,7 11,8 10,5 9,4 9,7 8,9 2,5 2,2 2,1 8,7 7,3 6,9 RMRS 2,7 2,4 2,4 0,6 0,7 0,7 2,8 3 3,1 3,6 2,7 2,1 1,7 1,3 1,3 IR 5,2 5,6 6 2,7 2,8 3 1,3 1,2 1 1,1 1,1 1 1,1 1,1 1,1 © Clarksons Research/ HANSA 54 HANSA International Maritime Journal 08 | 2019

Schiffstechnik | Ship Technology IR Class targets the European markets © IR Class © In July, IR Class is taking over chairmanship of the international classification association IACS with some specific goals. Besides that, the Indians have the ambition to grow, in particular in Europe. By Michael Meyer Arun Sharma is taking over IACS chairmanship. In the meantime, IR Class is growing in the European market with smaller vessels and ferries For HANSA, Executive Chairman Arun Sharma summarizes his focus areas during IACS Chairmanship under the topics Fuel 2020, GHG emissions, cyber safety and »use of technology«. In addition, IR Class intends to enhance interaction with stakeholders and working on their inputs, future proofing of IACS to maintain its relevance with possible increase in members, supporting the industry in dealing with technological aspects of low/zero carbon emission fuels and working with IMO on matters related to MASS and cyber security. »Another area is the human element in shipping to deal with technological and regulatory advancements, which could include upskilling and reskilling of the workforce,« he emphasizes. Currently and after some growth of 4 mill. GT in four years, IR Class has around 1,900 ships with 13 mill. GT in its fleet. A big share is coming from the tanker sector, followed by bulkers, gas carriers and other ship types like FPSOs or FSRUs. However, in the newbuilding sector IR Class today is more active in smaller vessels, like minibulkers and cement carriers. Another core area is the inland waterway system. Founded in 1975 and a full member of IACS since 2010, the body received recognition of the European Commission in 2016 and from 41 flag states. But all this is understood to be only an interim stage. Managing Director Suresh Shina tells HANSA that the goal is to expand the fleet to 3,000 vessels and 20 mill. GT by the year 2025. Especially in Europe Shina sees some potential for growth. »Our focus now is on regional expansion. We want to provide services, classification and beyond,« he says. Today, IR Class already has offices in London, Piraeus, Rotterdam, Cyprus, Bulgaria and Malta. The body is still often seen as a player for the Indian shipping market, not least due to the big business contracts with the national navy for its fleet renewal programme. But after a growth of 22% in 2018 around 16% of the classed fleet is from outside India already, the managing director states, referring to a number of worldwide newbuilding contracts, amongst others for minibulkers and ferries under construction in South Korea and Greece. A minor share of the fleet already is from Europe, although only of small size, he says. Greece is the first target named for the growth ambitions in Europe (»there are good opportunities there«), especially the local and regional ferry markets. Another »interesting« place are the Netherlands. A »possible next market« would be Germany, Shina emphasizes, taking a differentiated yet confident view: »There is a lot of newbuilding activity happening in India, especially from the Indian Navy, for which we are the preferred class. For these units, a lot of equipment is being supplied from Europe and Germany is one of the areas with a big number of suppliers of specialized marine components. I think people have started knowing us.« As other foreign classification societies did a couple of years ago, IR Class targets the segment of small and midsize shipowners which might not be completely satisfied with their »traditional« class. But this can be a bumpy road. »It takes time to get into a new market with all the established players there. But I believe there is room for everyone,« the managing director thinks. Besides Europe, the Indians have other markets in mind, too. Business has been started in Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, Malaysia, Indonesia and Nigeria. The flipside is the steady need for qualified staff. Shina therefore names the search for new employees as one of the biggest homework tasks. Today, the whole group has a staff of almost 900, with 400 people in the marine services department. In the next two years, around 100 more are needed. n HANSA International Maritime Journal 08 | 2019 55

HANSA Magazine

HANSA Magazine

Hansa News Headlines